PRECIOUS NINE MONTHS OF PREGNANCY

Here is a month by month guide has to how Your Baby Grows in those nine months.
1st month 4th month 7th month
2nd month 5th month 8th month
3rd month 6th month 9th month


A monthly diary of your baby's development

(MONTH ONE)

Your Baby

For the first 8 weeks, your developing baby is called an "embryo." Tiny limb buds, which will grow into arms and legs, appear. Embryo looks like a tadpole. Heart and lungs beginning to form. By the 25th day, heart starts to beat. Neural tube, which becomes the brain and spinal cord, begins to form. At end of first month, embryo is about 1/2 inch long and weighs less than 1 ounce.

Your Body

You become pregnant and miss your period. Your body is making hormones needed to "grow" a baby. Your breasts are slightly bigger and sore. If you have morning sickness, try eating crackers. You may have cravings, or hate foods you usually like. You will urinate more often because your growing uterus is pressing on your bladder.

Prenatal Care Guide

Before you get pregnant, supplement your diet with B vitamin folic acid (found in most multivitamins) to reduce the risk of birth defects of the brain and spine. Visit your health care provider for your first prenatal care checkup as soon as you think you are pregnant. During the first 8 weeks of pregnancy, all of your baby's organs are forming and can be damaged if you smoke, drink alcohol or take drugs. Ask your health care provider before taking any prescription drugs or over-the-counter products. Stop smoking and drinking alcohol.

Top


(MONTH TWO)

2 monthsYour Baby

All major body organs and systems are formed but not completely developed. Early stages of placenta, which exchanges nutrients from your body for waste products produced by the baby, are visible and working. Ears, ankles and wrists are formed. Eyelids form and grow but are sealed shut. Fingers and toes are developed. By end of second month, fetus looks more like a person than a tadpole, is about 1 inch long and still weighs less than 1 ounce.

Your Body

Your breasts are still sore; your nipples and the area around them begin to darken. Morning sickness may continue. You may feel tired and need to rest more as your body adjusts to being pregnant. The total amount of blood in your body increases.

Prenatal Care Guide

Visit your health care provider for one prenatal care checkup. Eat a variety of healthy foods from the five major food groups: cereals and grains; fruits; vegetables; dairy products; and meats and beans. Continue to supplement your diet with folic acid during your second and third months of pregnancy to reduce the risk of certain birth defects. Drink at least 6 to 8 glasses of water, juice and/or milk every day. Don't cut down on salt unless your doctor says so.

Top


(MONTH THREE)

3 monthsYour Baby

After 8 weeks as embryo, baby now is called a "fetus." Fingers and toes have soft nails. Mouth has 20 buds that will become "baby teeth." You can hear your baby's heartbeat for the first time (10 to 12 weeks) using a special instrument called a "doptone." For the rest of pregnancy, all body organs will mature and fetus will gain weight. By the end of this month, the fetus is 4 inches long and weighs a little over 1 ounce.

Your Body

You may still feel tired and have morning sickness. You may have headaches. You may get lightheaded or dizzy. Your clothes may begin to feel tight around your waist and breasts. Try pullover tops and skirts/pants with elastic waists.

Prenatal Care Guide

Visit your doctor or health care provider for one prenatal care checkup. You have a slightly increased need for almost all vitamins and minerals to nourish Your Baby. A healthy diet meets most of these needs. You may have gained 3 or 4 pounds by now. A woman who starts pregnancy at a normal weight should gain 25 to 35 pounds. Ask your health care provider how much weight you should gain. Exercise can be fun and good for both of you. Walking is a good choice. If your health care provider recommends prenatal testing using chorionic villus sampling (CVS), it will be done now. By the end of the 3rd month, the fetus is 4 inches long and weighs a little over 1 ounce.

Top


(MONTH FOUR)

4 monthsYour Baby

The fetus moves, kicks, swallows, and can hear your voice. The skin is pink and transparent. Umbilical cord continues to grow and thicken to carry enough nourishment from mother to fetus -- but it also can pass along hazards like tobacco, alcohol and other drugs. Placenta is fully formed. By end of 4th month, fetus is 6 to 7 inches long and weighs about 5 ounces.

Your Body

Appetite increases as morning sickness goes away and you should begin to feel more energetic. Toward the end of the 4th month (16-20 weeks), you might feel the faint movement of Your Baby for the first time; tell your doctor. Your belly begins to show -- you probably will need maternity clothes and bigger bras this month.

Prenatal Care Guide

Visit your health care provider for one prenatal care checkup. Pregnant women need extra iron -- more than even a good diet can supply. Your doctor may recommend iron supplements. You'll probably gain about 1 pound a week, or 12 to 14 pounds, during the second trimester (months 4-6). If your health care provider recommends prenatal testing using amniocentesis, or alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) testing for neural tube defects, they will be done at 16 to 18 weeks. By the end of the 4th month, the fetus is 6 to 7 inches long and weighs about 5 ounces.

Top


(MONTH FIVE)

5 monthsYour Baby

Fetus becomes more active, turning from side to side and sometimes head over heels. Fingernails have grown to tips of fingers. Fetus sleeps and wakes at regular intervals. Fetus has a month of rapid growth. At the end of the 5th month, fetus is 8-12 inches long and weighs 1/2 to 1 pound.

Your Body

If you haven't already, you will begin to feel Your Baby moving inside you. Be sure to tell your doctor. Your uterus has grown to the height of your belly button. Your heart beats faster. You may need 8 hours of sleep each night. During the day, take rest breaks if tired. Don't push yourself. You may get leg cramps, especially at night, if you're not getting enough calcium.

Prenatal Care Guide

Visit your doctor or health care provider for one prenatal care checkup. Your Baby's growth and weight gain are most likely to be affected if you're still smoking, drinking or taking drugs. It's never too late to quit or cut down as much as you can. Continue eating a healthy, nutritious diet and drink lots of juice, water and milk every day. By the end of the 5th month, the fetus is 8 to 12 inches long and weighs 1/2 to 1 pound.

Top


(MONTH SIX)

6 monthsYour Baby

Skin is red and wrinkled and covered with fine, soft hair. Fetus at this stage usually is too small and its lungs not ready for life outside its mother. If born now, fetus might survive with intensive care. Eyelids begin to part and the eyes open. Finger and toe prints can be seen. Fetus continues its rapid growth. At the end of the 6th month, the fetus is 11 to 14 inches long and weighs 1 to 1-1/2 pounds.

Your Body

You may feel the fetus kicking strongly now. The skin on your growing belly may start to itch. Your back may hurt. Wear low-heel shoes or flats. Exercise can help prevent backaches. Don't stand for long periods of time. You may feel pain down the side of your belly as your uterus stretches.

Prenatal Care Guide

Visit your health care provider for one prenatal care checkup. You may be constipated. Drink more water or fruit juice, eat more foods with fiber (like fruits and vegetables) and get some exercise. To help with heartburn, try eating 4 or 5 smaller meals during the day. Do not take laxatives or antacids without asking your health care provider. By the end of the 6th month, the fetus is 11 to 14 inches long and weighs 1 to 1 1/2 pounds.

Top


(MONTH SEVEN)

7 monthsYour Baby

Fetus can open and close its eyes, suck its thumb and cry. Exercises by kicking and stretching. Fetus responds to light and sound. If born now, fetus has a good chance for survival. Fetus is now about 15 inches long and weighs about 3 pounds.

Your Body

If your ankles and feet swell from standing, lie down with your feet raised. If swelling lasts longer than 24 hours, or if hands and face swell suddenly, call your health care provider. Stretch marks may appear on the abdomen and breasts as they get bigger. You may feel false labor contractions, also called Braxton Hicks. This is normal but call your health care provider if you have more than 5 contractions in one hour. As your belly gets bigger, you may lose your sense of balance. This makes it easier to fall. Be careful!

Prenatal Care Guide

Visit your doctor or health care provider for one prenatal care checkup. Continue to eat a variety of foods that are good for you. You should gain 1 pound a week this month. Get plenty of rest -- your body is working hard. Start childbirth education classes soon. Most health care providers do a blood test for maternal diabetes at 28 to 30 weeks. By the end of the 7th month, the fetus is about 15 inches long and weighs about 3 pounds.

Top


(MONTH EIGHT)

8 monthsYour Baby

Rapid brain growth continues. Fetus is too big to move around much but can kick strongly and roll around. You may notice the shape of an elbow or heel through your abdomen. Bones of the head are soft and flexible to make it easier for baby to fit through the birth canal. Lungs may still be immature. If born around 37 weeks, fetus is premature but has an excellent chance for survival. Fetus is now about 18 inches long and weighs about 5 pounds.

Your Body

Stronger contractions may be felt this month. You may have some leakage of colostrum (the fluid that will feed Your Baby until your milk comes in) from your breasts as they begin to produce milk. May have trouble sleeping because it is hard to get comfortable. Try putting several pillows under your head. May develop shortness of breath as baby crowds your lungs. Baby may crowd your stomach. Try eating 5 or 6 smaller meals during the day. Top of your uterus lies just under your rib cage.

Prenatal Care Guide

After the 32nd week, visit your health care provider every 2 weeks for prenatal care checkups. You should gain 1 pound a week this month. Call your health care provider right away if you have:

Bleeding or a gush of fluid from your vagina. Cramps, stomach pains or a dull backache. Blurry vision, or spots before your eyes. A feeling that the baby is pushing down. A noticeable decrease in the baby's movements. More than 5 contractions in one hour.

By the end of the 8th month, the fetus is about 18 inches long and weighs about 5 pounds.

Top


(MONTH NINE)

9 monthsYour Baby

At 38-40 weeks, Your Baby is "full term." Baby's lungs are mature and ready to function on their own. During this month, baby gains about 1/2 pound a week. Baby usually "drops" into a head-down position and rests lower in the mother's abdomen. By end of 9th month, baby weighs 6-9 pounds and is 19-21 inches long.

Your Body

Your bellybutton may stick out. Your breathing should be easier once the baby "drops" but you'll have to urinate more often because baby is pressing on your bladder Swelling of ankles and feet may increase. Your cervix will open up (dilate) and thin out (efface) as it prepares for birth. You may be very uncomfortable because of the pressure and weight of the fetus. Be sure to rest often.

Prenatal Care Guide

After the 36th week, visit your health care provider once a week for prenatal care checkups. You may not gain any weight at all this month, or even lose 1 or 2 pounds. You may have gained 8-10 pounds during the last three months. Decide whether you are going to breastfeed or bottle feed your baby. Time your contractions. You are in labor if your contractions:

Are regular or evenly spaced apart (every 10 minutes, for example). Happen more than 5 times an hour. Last for 30 to 70 seconds. Get worse as you move around.

Call your health care provider if you think you are in labor. By the end of the 9th month, the baby weighs 6 to 9 pounds and is 19 to 21 inches long.

 


Payment Gateway And Merchant ACCount Powered By CCAvenue.